Zenport Grafting Tape ZJ825 Film Grafting Tape, 1.2-Inches Wide By 426-Feet Long

Zenport Grafting Tape ZJ825 Film Grafting Tape, 1.2-Inches Wide by 426-Feet Long. Buds and grafts succeed at a high rate with the use of Zenport film wrap. A gentle stretch makes it self-adhesive. Seals the bud or graft tightly keeping it moist and secure while allowing air to permeate the wound. Can also be applied over grafting rubber if a more secure hold is needed. Tape is clear and biodegradable in sunlight (thickness is 5mil). Recommended for deciduous fruit and nut trees, roses, grapevines, citrus fruit trees, coniferous evergreens, ornamental trees, deciduous shade trees and bonsai trees.

Zenport Grafting Tape ZJ825 Film Grafting Tape, 1.2-Inches Wide by 426-Feet Long

Reasons for grafting and budding:

  • Perpetuate clones. Clones of numerous species cannot be economically reproduced from vegetative cuttings because the percentage of cuttings that root successfully is low. For example numerous clones of Japanese maple that either root poorly or lack an extensive root systems are grafted onto the seedling of an Acer palmatum rootstock.
  • Take advantage of particular rootstocks. Certain rootstocks have superior growth habits, disease and insect resistance, and drought tolerance. For example the French crabapple can increase resistance to crown gall and hairy root in apple trees.
  • Increase the growth rate of seedlings. The seedling progeny of many fruit and nut breeding programs may require 8 to 12 years to become fruitful. However, if these progeny are grafted onto established plants, the time required for them to flower and fruit is reduced dramatically.
  • Repair damaged plants. Large trees or specimen plants can be damaged easily above the soil line. The damage can often be repaired by planting several seedlings of the same species around the injured tree and grafting them above the injury.
  • Change varieties or cultivars. Newer varieties of trees may offer improved insect or disease resistance, better drought tolerance, or higher yields. As long as the scion is compatible with the rootstock, the older orchard may be top worked using the improved variety or cultivar.
  • Produce certain plant forms. Numerous horticultural plants owe their beauty to the fact that they are grafted or budded onto a standard, especially those that have a weeping or cascading form.
  • Optimize cross-pollination. Certain fruit trees are not self-pollinating; they require pollination by a second fruit tree through cross-pollination. To ensure good fruit set on the female (pistillate) plant, a male (staminate) plant must be growing nearby. Where this is not possible, the chances that cross-pollination will occur can be increased by grafting a scion from a male plant onto the female plant.

Unlike budding, which can be performed before or during the growing season, most grafting is done during winter and early spring while both scion and rootstock are still dormant.

Zenport Grafting Tape TK631 Black, 3/4-Inch By 66-Feet Long For Grafting Fruit Trees And Vines

Zenport Grafting Tape TK631 Black 3/4-Inch by 66-Feet Long for Grafting Fruit Trees and Vines. Wrap your vine and tree grafts to keep them tight to prevent drying. First wrap the vine or tree graft with electrical tape; then you have the option of carefully covering the union and binding material with grafting compound.

Start wrapping on the stock and work up onto the scion. Remove wrapping as soon as the scion has started to grow to prevent girdling of the tree. Plasticized PVC rubber based adhesive. Tensile strength (N/cm) 26N/cm. Elongation at break 200%. Peel adhesion 1.8N/cm.

Zenport Grafting Tape TK631 Black, 3/4-Inch by 66-Feet Long for Grafting Fruit Trees and Vines

Zenport Horticulture Knife K107 Folding Horticulture Knife, 3.5-Inch Stainless

Zenport Knife K107 folding horticulture knife, with a stainless steel, 3.5-inch (89mm), slight inward curve cutting blade, useful for numerous horticulture and agriculture applications such as pruning, harvesting, picking, trimming, peeling, grafting and budding.

Blade made of SK5 Japanese rust and disease resistant stainless steel. Safety orange handle for easy identification in processing plant, packing shed or out in the field. 3.5-inch (89mm) blade, 7.5-inch (191mm) overall length open with handle.

  • Zenport Knife K107 folding horticulture knife
  • Stainless steel, 3.5-inch (89mm), slight inward curve cutting blade
  • Useful for numerous horticulture and agriculture applications such as pruning, harvesting, picking, trimming, peeling, grafting and budding
  • Blade made of SK5 Japanese rust and disease resistant stainless steel
  • Safety orange handle for easy identification in processing plant, packing shed or out in the field
  • 3.5-inch (89mm) blade
  • 7.5-inch (191mm) overall length open with handle
Zenport Horticulture Knife K107 Folding Horticulture Knife, 3.5-Inch Stainless

Zenport Grafting Tool ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool For Grafting Fruit Trees And Vines

Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool for Grafting Fruit Trees and Vines. Quickly and easily create professional quality grafts. A small efficient tool, the Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool executes the long V cleft cut most popular in Europe.

Makes compatible cuts on both scion and root stock. The clean cuts made by the grafting tool allow you to get a perfect fit, every time. This increases the likelihood of the graft ‘taking’, leading to much less wastage. The efficiency of all grafting is shown in the take and speed of operation. Save 50% of labor costs, users report 90% or higher success rates.

Zenport Grafting Tool ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool for Grafting Fruit Trees and Vines

Use in the field, or bench mount. Designed for durability and a wide range of graft sizes. Even beginners get professional results. Steel hardened “V” cut blade for clean cuts, perfect match. Tempered steel blades, handles wood from 1/8 in. to 1 and 3/16 in., for both soft and hard wood.

The Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool is a precision instrument consisting of two blades, made of hardened steel, which can be removed, sharpened or replaced. The, anvil is grooved and positions the grafting wood in the centre to provide a precision cut.

The handle operates like a pair of pliers, and is spring loaded to open, ready for the next cut. The grafter can be bench mounted, or used loose for fieldwork.

To operate the grafter, the stock is first placed on the anvil and a “v” groove is neatly sliced out.

The scion wood selected is next positioned from the other side of the grafter, and sliced. The resultant cut matches perfectly with the rootstock.

It’s important the selected scion wood is of similar size as the stock to be grafted. This ensures the cambium layers fit neatly together.

The Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool is suitable for grafts from three millimetres to thirty millimetres. This graft is then taped as normal, and the operation completed.

With the addition of the foot-operated Bench Mount the grafting procedure is greatly speeded. This accessory was designed for vineyards, orchards and nurseries that perform both bench grafting and field grafting.

The bench mount is attached to the workbench and the grafter is clipped into the mount with the blades facing the operator. A foot lever then operates the tool. With this accessory, daily throughput of bench grafts is more than doubled and the tool can be disengaged from the bench mount for fieldwork in less than a minute.

Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool Operation

  1. Place rootstock up under skirt of blades with the rootstock positioned to the right hand side of Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool to ensure the female V is in the rootstock.
  2. Holding rootstock in both hands depress the pedal down and bringing blades and wood down onto centre anvils. Ensure the rootstock is brought down into the grooved area of the anvils.
  3. As the blades slice through the wood gently, pull either side of the rootstock outwards away from the blades ensuring a clean cut.
  4. Once this initial cut to the rootstock is completed choose a your scion wood which fits the diameter of the rootstock.
  5. Repeat cut ensuring that this cut is reversed with bud of Scion wood positioned to the left hand side of Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool.
  6. Once both cuts are completed, place the scion wood inside the V of the rootstock and tape all areas of the graft to protect cut and reduce air. This will ensure maximum cambium contact giving strong, tidy grafts.
  7. Re-sharpening and polishing of the blades regularly will preserve blade condition.

Holding the Grafting Stock
It is recommended that when grafting the rootstock this should be held in two hands. The rootstock should be held on the side of the stock firmly between thumb and forefingers of each hand. Ensure fingers are a safe distance from the blades as the cut is completed. As the cuts is made the operator should pull hands outwards helping the graft to separate.

As the cut is completed, the operator should help the cut separate. The operator fingers should never touch the anvils or blades while cutting action is performed.

Bud cutting/scion should be performed with fingers either side of the bus ensuring again that the fingers do not touch the anvils or blades as the cut is completed.

Sharpening Blades
Remove from the machine and sharpen. Pay particular attention to tip area. We suggest that the best method to sharpen is to simply polish blade face and edge with a fine grade wet and dry sand paper, and to lightly steel with ordinary kitchen knife steel.

Blade Angle
Reposition blades to machine. Adjust blade angle e.g. bottom in or out. There is no set position for this and is purely an operator adjustment. An operator once familiar with sharpening and installing blades will be aware that when adjusting this angle a difference in cut can be detected. This is at times advantageous when grafting various sizes of wood.

Blade Installation Procedure
Fit blades to machine, at this stage do not fully tighten screw. Hold blade tips together and tighten screws evenly until the blades barely tension. Place thumb and forefinger under the face of blades and hold blades in an upward position. Slightly tighten the two bottom screws while maintaining this upward pressure. Slightly tighten the two top screws. Repeat the procedure until blade screws are tight. It is not necessary to over tighten blade screws.

Dress Blade Tips
As blades (which are under tension) settle it is not uncommon on some woods to leave a slight chipped effect on the rootstock. This is due to a slight spreading effect of tips. To over come this, dress the front of the blade tip area with a fine file. Once this has been completed sand the blades placing emphasis in the tip of the blade and area making the cuts.

For sanding we recommend using light sandpaper such as wet and dry P400 that has been dipped in methylated spirits. Using methylated spirits will breakdown the sap build up on blades and ensure a clean cut of grafting stock.

Check Anvil Alignment
Male anvil should be slightly proud of V anvil. If this is not so, remove the anvil and hold extended section in vice and form.

Remove Blades
Zenport recommends that blades on the tools are removed or loosened at the end of each grafting season. The Zenport blades work under tension and if left on tools for extended periods will loose blade tension causing blades to “split” as cuts are executed and discontinue to complete cuts as previous.

To Reset Blades

Unlike budding, which can be performed before or during the growing season, most grafting is done during winter and early spring while both scion and rootstock are still dormant.

  1. Initial attachment of blade is to be that of blade closest to shaft. Place both screws in loosely. Tighten top screw first by applying pressure to blade to push the top of blade in an outward movement and bottom of blade inwards.
  2. Repeat process with blade closest to operator. Before tightening this should be held slightly proud of first blade. As screws are tightened the blade will drop in to place forming a “V” ready to perform cuts. Note Do not over tighten screws, as they will be removed repeatedly.
  3. Affix attach female anvil loosely then move blades to the lowest position. Centre female anvil to the point of the blades then tighten female anvil.
    Once more move blades to the lowest position and affix the male anvil. Centre this so that as blades do not touch anvil as maneuvered.
  4. Slowly release blades from lowest position ensuring that no part of the blade touches anvils as the knife carriers moves. Trial cut with no grafting stock again ensuring that no part of the blade touches anvils.
  5. Trial cut with unwanted stock. If blades do not complete cut without touching blades reset male anvil positioning. Note if blades are continually hitting anvils blades will rapidly become blunt hindering the potential graft take.
    • Perpetuate clones. Clones of numerous species cannot be economically reproduced from vegetative cuttings because the percentage of cuttings that root successfully is low. For example numerous clones of Japanese maple that either root poorly or lack an extensive root systems are grafted onto the seedling of a rootstock.
    • Take advantage of particular rootstocks. Certain rootstocks have superior growth habits, disease and insect resistance, and drought tolerance. For example the French crabapple can increase resistance to crown gall and hairy root in apple trees.
    • Increase the growth rate of seedlings. The seedling progeny of many fruit and nut breeding programs may require 8 to 12 years to become fruitful. However, if these progeny are grafted onto established plants, the time required for them to flower and fruit is reduced dramatically.
    • Repair damaged plants. Large trees or specimen plants can be damaged easily above the soil line. The damage can often be repaired by planting several seedlings of the same species around the injured tree and grafting them above the injury.
    • Change varieties or cultivars. Newer varieties of trees may offer improved insect or disease resistance, better drought tolerance, or higher yields. As long as the scion is compatible with the rootstock, the older orchard may be top worked using the improved variety or cultivar.
    • Produce certain plant forms. Numerous horticultural plants owe their beauty to the fact that they are grafted or budded onto a standard, especially those that have a weeping or cascading form.
    • Optimize cross-pollination. Certain fruit trees are not self-pollinating; they require pollination by a second fruit tree through cross-pollination. To ensure good fruit set on the female (pistillate) plant, a male (staminate) plant must be growing nearby. Where this is not possible, the chances that cross-pollination will occur can be increased by grafting a scion from a male plant onto the female plant.

Zenport Grafting Tool ZJ67 Omega-Cut Grafting Tool For Grafting Fruit Trees And Vines

Zenport Grafting Tool ZJ67 Omega-Cut Grafting Tool for Grafting Fruit Trees and Vines. Quickly and easily create professional quality grafts. The clean cuts made by the grafting tool allow you to get a perfect fit, every time. This increases the likelihood of the graft ‘taking’, leading to much less wastage. The 2 in 1 tool contains both a pruner and grafting guillotine. This allows you to first prepare the plants to be grafted, by trimming away excess leaves and twigs. Then using the special grafting guillotine you can make a perfect omega cut into the grafting stock.

Zenport Grafting Tool ZJ67 Omega-Cut Grafting Tool for Grafting Fruit Trees and Vines

Create Precise Grafts With Ease

The tool allows you to quickly create omega style grafts. Even a novice can create perfect grafts with ease. The grafting blade is able to cut through stock up to 1.4 cm in diameter. Because the same blade is used on the root stock and scion, they will easily slot together and form a tight bond. The clean cut and snug fit increases the likelihood of the graft ‘taking’. For professionals this means less money lost to wastage on grafts that don’t take. For the amateur it means the confidence to experiment with grafting, without the worry of mastering complex grafting techniques.

Trimming Blades for Grafting Stock Preparation

The grafting tool also has small trimming blades. These can be used for preparing the grafting stock and scion. This allows you to work quickly without having to spend time swapping tools. Professionals will appreciate the speed and precision with which grafts can be made.

Replaceable Grafting Blade

When grafting, creating a clean cut is imperative. That is why the grafting tool features a replaceable blade. All blades on the tool are made from SK5 high carbon steel for increased strength and durability – but like any tool, with extensive use they will eventually lose their edge. When this happens, replacements can be bought in batches of 3 or 10 and easily swapped in. Alternatively you can purchase a tool in a packages that includes 2 spare blades.

SK5 High Carbon Steel Blades

Both the trimming and grafting blades are made from SK5 high carbon steel. This means they will stay sharp for longer as well as resisting chipping and deformation. The blades have been hard-chrome treated which gives them better resistance to rusting.

Ergonomic handles

The grafting tool features ergonomic handles for comfort while grafting.

Specifications

Hard-Chrome treated blades are made from SK5 high carbon steel. The 2 in 1 tool contains both a pruner and omega grafting guillotine.

Reasons for grafting and budding:

  • Perpetuate clones. Clones of numerous species cannot be economically reproduced from vegetative cuttings because the percentage of cuttings that root successfully is low. For example numerous clones of Japanese maple that either root poorly or lack an extensive root systems are grafted onto the seedling of an Acer palmatum rootstock.
  • Take advantage of particular rootstocks. Certain rootstocks have superior growth habits, disease and insect resistance, and drought tolerance. For example the French crabapple can increase resistance to crown gall and hairy root in apple trees.
  • Increase the growth rate of seedlings. The seedling progeny of many fruit and nut breeding programs may require 8 to 12 years to become fruitful. However, if these progeny are grafted onto established plants, the time required for them to flower and fruit is reduced dramatically.
  • Repair damaged plants. Large trees or specimen plants can be damaged easily above the soil line. The damage can often be repaired by planting several seedlings of the same species around the injured tree and grafting them above the injury.
  • Change varieties or cultivars. Newer varieties of trees may offer improved insect or disease resistance, better drought tolerance, or higher yields. As long as the scion is compatible with the rootstock, the older orchard may be top worked using the improved variety or cultivar.
  • Produce certain plant forms. Numerous horticultural plants owe their beauty to the fact that they are grafted or budded onto a standard, especially those that have a weeping or cascading form.
  • Optimize cross-pollination. Certain fruit trees are not self-pollinating; they require pollination by a second fruit tree through cross-pollination. To ensure good fruit set on the female (pistillate) plant, a male (staminate) plant must be growing nearby. Where this is not possible, the chances that cross-pollination will occur can be increased by grafting a scion from a male plant onto the female plant.

Unlike budding, which can be performed before or during the growing season, most grafting is done during winter and early spring while both scion and rootstock are still dormant.

Zenport Grafting Tool ZJ60 Multi-Graft Tool, Grafting Shears

The Zenport ZJ60 Multi-Graft Tool, Grafting Shears are a multi-facet tool allowing inexperienced people to safely complete at least 6 different graft types with ease. This tool enables the first time grafter to prepare the following grafts – tongue, cleft, rind, whip & tongue & wedge grafts. You can also complete chip & ‘T’ buds.

Zenport Grafting Tool ZJ60 Multi-Graft Tool, Grafting Shears

Reasons for grafting and budding:

  • Perpetuate clones. Clones of numerous species cannot be economically reproduced from vegetative cuttings because the percentage of cuttings that root successfully is low. For example numerous clones of Japanese maple that either root poorly or lack an extensive root systems are grafted onto the seedling of an Acer palmatum rootstock.
  • Take advantage of particular rootstocks. Certain rootstocks have superior growth habits, disease and insect resistance, and drought tolerance. For example the French crabapple can increase resistance to crown gall and hairy root in apple trees.
  • Increase the growth rate of seedlings. The seedling progeny of many fruit and nut breeding programs may require 8 to 12 years to become fruitful. However, if these progeny are grafted onto established plants, the time required for them to flower and fruit is reduced dramatically.
  • Repair damaged plants. Large trees or specimen plants can be damaged easily above the soil line. The damage can often be repaired by planting several seedlings of the same species around the injured tree and grafting them above the injury.
  • Change varieties or cultivars. Newer varieties of trees may offer improved insect or disease resistance, better drought tolerance, or higher yields. As long as the scion is compatible with the rootstock, the older orchard may be top worked using the improved variety or cultivar.
  • Produce certain plant forms. Numerous horticultural plants owe their beauty to the fact that they are grafted or budded onto a standard, especially those that have a weeping or cascading form.
  • Optimize cross-pollination. Certain fruit trees are not self-pollinating; they require pollination by a second fruit tree through cross-pollination. To ensure good fruit set on the female (pistillate) plant, a male (staminate) plant must be growing nearby. Where this is not possible, the chances that cross-pollination will occur can be increased by grafting a scion from a male plant onto the female plant.

Unlike budding, which can be performed before or during the growing season, most grafting is done during winter and early spring while both scion and rootstock are still dormant.

Zenport Grafting Tool Blade ZJ68-A Replacement V-Cut Top Grafting Blade For Grafting Fruit Trees And Vines

Zenport Grafting Tool Blade ZJ68-A Replacement V-Cut Top Grafting Blade for Grafting Fruit Trees and Vines. Quickly and easily create professional quality grafts. The clean cuts made by the grafting tool allow you to get a perfect fit, every time.

Makes compatible cuts on both scion and root stock. This increases the likelihood of the graft ‘taking’, leading to much less wastage. Save 50% of labor costs, users report 90% or higher success rates. Use in the field, or bench mount. Designed for durability and a wide range of graft sizes. Even beginners get professional results. Steel hardened “V” cut blade for clean cuts, perfect match. Tempered steel blades, handles wood from 1/8 in. to 1 and 3/16 in., for both soft and hard wood.

Zenport Grafting Tool Blade ZJ68-A Replacement V-Cut Top Grafting Blade for Grafting Fruit Trees and Vines


Use in the field, or bench mount. Designed for durability and a wide range of graft sizes. Even beginners get professional results. Steel hardened “V” cut blade for clean cuts, perfect match. Tempered steel blades, handles wood from 1/8 in. to 1 and 3/16 in., for both soft and hard wood.

The Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool is a precision instrument consisting of two blades, made of hardened steel, which can be removed, sharpened or replaced. The, anvil is grooved and positions the grafting wood in the centre to provide a precision cut.

The handle operates like a pair of pliers, and is spring loaded to open, ready for the next cut. The grafter can be bench mounted, or used loose for fieldwork.

To operate the grafter, the stock is first placed on the anvil and a “v” groove is neatly sliced out.

The scion wood selected is next positioned from the other side of the grafter, and sliced. The resultant cut matches perfectly with the rootstock.

It’s important the selected scion wood is of similar size as the stock to be grafted. This ensures the cambium layers fit neatly together.

The Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool is suitable for grafts from three millimetres to thirty millimetres. This graft is then taped as normal, and the operation completed.

With the addition of the foot-operated Bench Mount the grafting procedure is greatly speeded. This accessory was designed for vineyards, orchards and nurseries that perform both bench grafting and field grafting.

The bench mount is attached to the workbench and the grafter is clipped into the mount with the blades facing the operator. A foot lever then operates the tool. With this accessory, daily throughput of bench grafts is more than doubled and the tool can be disengaged from the bench mount for fieldwork in less than a minute.

Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool Operation

  1. Place rootstock up under skirt of blades with the rootstock positioned to the right hand side of Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool to ensure the female V is in the rootstock.
  2. Holding rootstock in both hands depress the pedal down and bringing blades and wood down onto centre anvils. Ensure the rootstock is brought down into the grooved area of the anvils.
  3. As the blades slice through the wood gently, pull either side of the rootstock outwards away from the blades ensuring a clean cut.
  4. Once this initial cut to the rootstock is completed choose a your scion wood which fits the diameter of the rootstock.
  5. Repeat cut ensuring that this cut is reversed with bud of Scion wood positioned to the left hand side of Zenport ZJ68 V-Cut Top Grafting Tool.
  6. Once both cuts are completed, place the scion wood inside the V of the rootstock and tape all areas of the graft to protect cut and reduce air. This will ensure maximum cambium contact giving strong, tidy grafts.
  7. Re-sharpening and polishing of the blades regularly will preserve blade condition.

Holding the Grafting Stock
It is recommended that when grafting the rootstock this should be held in two hands. The rootstock should be held on the side of the stock firmly between thumb and forefingers of each hand. Ensure fingers are a safe distance from the blades as the cut is completed. As the cuts is made the operator should pull hands outwards helping the graft to separate.

As the cut is completed, the operator should help the cut separate. The operator fingers should never touch the anvils or blades while cutting action is performed.

Bud cutting/scion should be performed with fingers either side of the bus ensuring again that the fingers do not touch the anvils or blades as the cut is completed.

Sharpening Blades
Remove from the machine and sharpen. Pay particular attention to tip area. We suggest that the best method to sharpen is to simply polish blade face and edge with a fine grade wet and dry sand paper, and to lightly steel with ordinary kitchen knife steel.

Blade Angle
Reposition blades to machine. Adjust blade angle e.g. bottom in or out. There is no set position for this and is purely an operator adjustment. An operator once familiar with sharpening and installing blades will be aware that when adjusting this angle a difference in cut can be detected. This is at times advantageous when grafting various sizes of wood.

Blade Installation Procedure
Fit blades to machine, at this stage do not fully tighten screw. Hold blade tips together and tighten screws evenly until the blades barely tension. Place thumb and forefinger under the face of blades and hold blades in an upward position. Slightly tighten the two bottom screws while maintaining this upward pressure. Slightly tighten the two top screws. Repeat the procedure until blade screws are tight. It is not necessary to over tighten blade screws.

Dress Blade Tips
As blades (which are under tension) settle it is not uncommon on some woods to leave a slight chipped effect on the rootstock. This is due to a slight spreading effect of tips. To over come this, dress the front of the blade tip area with a fine file. Once this has been completed sand the blades placing emphasis in the tip of the blade and area making the cuts.

For sanding we recommend using light sandpaper such as wet and dry P400 that has been dipped in methylated spirits. Using methylated spirits will breakdown the sap build up on blades and ensure a clean cut of grafting stock.

Check Anvil Alignment
Male anvil should be slightly proud of V anvil. If this is not so, remove the anvil and hold extended section in vice and form.

Remove Blades
Zenport recommends that blades on the tools are removed or loosened at the end of each grafting season. The Zenport blades work under tension and if left on tools for extended periods will loose blade tension causing blades to “split” as cuts are executed and discontinue to complete cuts as previous.

To Reset Blades

  1. Initial attachment of blade is to be that of blade closest to shaft. Place both screws in loosely. Tighten top screw first by applying pressure to blade to push the top of blade in an outward movement and bottom of blade inwards.
  2. Repeat process with blade closest to operator. Before tightening this should be held slightly proud of first blade. As screws are tightened the blade will drop in to place forming a “V” ready to perform cuts. Note Do not over tighten screws, as they will be removed repeatedly.
  3. Affix attach female anvil loosely then move blades to the lowest position. Centre female anvil to the point of the blades then tighten female anvil.
    Once more move blades to the lowest position and affix the male anvil. Centre this so that as blades do not touch anvil as manoeuvred.
  4. Slowly release blades from lowest position ensuring that no part of the blade touches anvils as the knife carriers moves. Trial cut with no grafting stock again ensuring that no part of the blade touches anvils.
  5. Trial cut with unwanted stock. If blades do not complete cut without touching blades reset male anvil positioning. Note if blades are continually hitting anvils blades will rapidly become blunt hindering the potential graft take.

Zenport ZJ67-B Omega-Cut Replacement Blade for Grafting Fruit Trees and Vines

Zenport ZJ67-B Omega-Cut Replacement Blade for Grafting Fruit Trees and Vines

Zenport Grafting Tool Blade ZJ67-B Omega-Cut Replacement Blade for Grafting Fruit Trees and Vines


Reasons for grafting and budding:

  • Perpetuate clones. Clones of numerous species cannot be economically reproduced from vegetative cuttings because the percentage of cuttings that root successfully is low. For example numerous clones of Japanese maple that either root poorly or lack an extensive root systems are grafted onto the seedling of an Acer palmatum rootstock.
  • Take advantage of particular rootstocks. Certain rootstocks have superior growth habits, disease and insect resistance, and drought tolerance. For example the French crabapple can increase resistance to crown gall and hairy root in apple trees.
  • Increase the growth rate of seedlings. The seedling progeny of many fruit and nut breeding programs may require 8 to 12 years to become fruitful. However, if these progeny are grafted onto established plants, the time required for them to flower and fruit is reduced dramatically.
  • Repair damaged plants. Large trees or specimen plants can be damaged easily above the soil line. The damage can often be repaired by planting several seedlings of the same species around the injured tree and grafting them above the injury.
  • Change varieties or cultivars. Newer varieties of trees may offer improved insect or disease resistance, better drought tolerance, or higher yields. As long as the scion is compatible with the rootstock, the older orchard may be top worked using the improved variety or cultivar.
  • Produce certain plant forms. Numerous horticultural plants owe their beauty to the fact that they are grafted or budded onto a standard, especially those that have a weeping or cascading form.
  • Optimize cross-pollination. Certain fruit trees are not self-pollinating; they require pollination by a second fruit tree through cross-pollination. To ensure good fruit set on the female (pistillate) plant, a male (staminate) plant must be growing nearby. Where this is not possible, the chances that cross-pollination will occur can be increased by grafting a scion from a male plant onto the female plant.

Unlike budding, which can be performed before or during the growing season, most grafting is done during winter and early spring while both scion and rootstock are still dormant.

Zenport Grafting Tool ZJ69 Professional Pocket Grafting Tool

The Zenport ZJ69 professional pocket grafting tool is an excellent choice for the avid horticulturalist. Simply hold the tool and place the target plant to be grafted inline with the grafting blade. Press with the thumb to complete the angle cut. Repeat the step, and combine both upper and lower cuttings securing the joint with grafting tape. Please note for use only with plants smaller than 9mm/.35-inch in diameter.

Zenport Grafting Tool ZJ69 Professional Pocket Grafting Tool

Reasons for grafting and budding:

  • Perpetuate clones. Clones of numerous species cannot be economically reproduced from vegetative cuttings because the percentage of cuttings that root successfully is low. For example numerous clones of Japanese maple that either root poorly or lack an extensive root systems are grafted onto the seedling of an Acer palmatum rootstock.
  • Take advantage of particular rootstocks. Certain rootstocks have superior growth habits, disease and insect resistance, and drought tolerance. For example the French crabapple can increase resistance to crown gall and hairy root in apple trees.
  • Increase the growth rate of seedlings. The seedling progeny of many fruit and nut breeding programs may require 8 to 12 years to become fruitful. However, if these progeny are grafted onto established plants, the time required for them to flower and fruit is reduced dramatically.
  • Repair damaged plants. Large trees or specimen plants can be damaged easily above the soil line. The damage can often be repaired by planting several seedlings of the same species around the injured tree and grafting them above the injury.
  • Change varieties or cultivars. Newer varieties of trees may offer improved insect or disease resistance, better drought tolerance, or higher yields. As long as the scion is compatible with the rootstock, the older orchard may be top worked using the improved variety or cultivar.
  • Produce certain plant forms. Numerous horticultural plants owe their beauty to the fact that they are grafted or budded onto a standard, especially those that have a weeping or cascading form.
  • Optimize cross-pollination. Certain fruit trees are not self-pollinating; they require pollination by a second fruit tree through cross-pollination. To ensure good fruit set on the female (pistillate) plant, a male (staminate) plant must be growing nearby. Where this is not possible, the chances that cross-pollination will occur can be increased by grafting a scion from a male plant onto the female plant.

Unlike budding, which can be performed before or during the growing season, most grafting is done during winter and early spring while both scion and rootstock are still dormant.

Zenport Grafting Knife K106A Budding And Grafting Knife, Clip-Point Blade, Dual-Taper Bevel Cutting Edge

Zenport Grafting Knife K106A Budding and Grafting Knife, Clip-Point Blade, Dual-Taper Bevel Cutting Edge. Zenport K106A folding grafting and budding knife with stainless steel 2-inch blade. Useful for numerous horticulture and agriculture applications such as pruning, trimming, grafting and budding. Blade made of SK5 Japanese rust and disease resistant stainless steel. Safety orange handle for easy identification in processing plant, packing shed or out in the field. 2-inch blade, 6-inch overall length open with handle.

Zenport Grafting Knife K106A Budding and Grafting Knife, Clip-Point Blade, Dual-Taper Bevel Cutting Edge


Grafting and Budding are techniques used to join two parts of a plant so that they grow together and appear as a single plant. In grafting, the upper part (scion) of one plant grows on the root system (rootstock) of another plant. In the budding process, a bud is taken from one plant and grown on another.

Reasons for grafting and budding:

  • Perpetuate clones. Clones of numerous species cannot be economically reproduced from vegetative cuttings because the percentage of cuttings that root successfully is low. For example numerous clones of Japanese maple that either root poorly or lack an extensive root systems are grafted onto the seedling of an Acer palmatum rootstock.
  • Take advantage of particular rootstocks. Certain rootstocks have superior growth habits, disease and insect resistance, and drought tolerance. For example the French crabapple can increase resistance to crown gall and hairy root in apple trees.
  • Increase the growth rate of seedlings. The seedling progeny of many fruit and nut breeding programs may require 8 to 12 years to become fruitful. However, if these progeny are grafted onto established plants, the time required for them to flower and fruit is reduced dramatically.
  • Repair damaged plants. Large trees or specimen plants can be damaged easily above the soil line. The damage can often be repaired by planting several seedlings of the same species around the injured tree and grafting them above the injury.
  • Change varieties or cultivars. Newer varieties of trees may offer improved insect or disease resistance, better drought tolerance, or higher yields. As long as the scion is compatible with the rootstock, the older orchard may be top worked using the improved variety or cultivar.
  • Produce certain plant forms. Numerous horticultural plants owe their beauty to the fact that they are grafted or budded onto a standard, especially those that have a weeping or cascading form.
  • Optimize cross-pollination. Certain fruit trees are not self-pollinating; they require pollination by a second fruit tree through cross-pollination. To ensure good fruit set on the female (pistillate) plant, a male (staminate) plant must be growing nearby. Where this is not possible, the chances that cross-pollination will occur can be increased by grafting a scion from a male plant onto the female plant.

Unlike budding, which can be performed before or during the growing season, most grafting is done during winter and early spring while both scion and rootstock are still dormant.

Zenport Grafting Knife K106 Budding And Grafting Knife, Bark Lifter, Dual-Taper Bevel Cutting Edge

Zenport Knife K106 Budding and Grafting Knife, Bark Lifter, Dual-Taper Bevel Cutting Edge, useful for numerous horticulture and agriculture applications such as pruning, trimming, grafting and budding. Blade made of SK5 Japanese rust and disease resistant stainless steel. Safety orange handle for easy identification in processing plant, packing shed or out in the field. 3-inch (76mm) blade, 7-inch (178mm) overall length open with handle.

Grafting and Budding are techniques used to join two parts of a plant so that they grow together and appear as a single plant. In grafting, the upper part (scion) of one plant grows on the root system (rootstock) of another plant. In the budding process, a bud is taken from one plant and grown on another.

Zenport Grafting Knife K106 Budding And Grafting Knife, Bark Lifter, Dual-Taper Bevel Cutting Edge

Reasons For Grafting And Budding:

  • Perpetuate clones. Clones of numerous species cannot be economically reproduced from vegetative cuttings because the percentage of cuttings that root successfully is low. For example numerous clones of Japanese maple that either root poorly or lack an extensive root systems are grafted onto the seedling of an Acer palmatum rootstock.
  • Take advantage of particular rootstocks. Certain rootstocks have superior growth habits, disease and insect resistance, and drought tolerance. For example the French crabapple can increase resistance to crown gall and hairy root in apple trees.
  • Increase the growth rate of seedlings. The seedling progeny of many fruit and nut breeding programs may require 8 to 12 years to become fruitful. However, if these progeny are grafted onto established plants, the time required for them to flower and fruit is reduced dramatically.
  • Repair damaged plants. Large trees or specimen plants can be damaged easily above the soil line. The damage can often be repaired by planting several seedlings of the same species around the injured tree and grafting them above the injury.
  • Change varieties or cultivars. Newer varieties of trees may offer improved insect or disease resistance, better drought tolerance, or higher yields. As long as the scion is compatible with the rootstock, the older orchard may be top worked using the improved variety or cultivar.
  • Produce certain plant forms. Numerous horticultural plants owe their beauty to the fact that they are grafted or budded onto a standard, especially those that have a weeping or cascading form.
  • Optimize cross-pollination. Certain fruit trees are not self-pollinating; they require pollination by a second fruit tree through cross-pollination. To ensure good fruit set on the female (pistillate) plant, a male (staminate) plant must be growing nearby. Where this is not possible, the chances that cross-pollination will occur can be increased by grafting a scion from a male plant onto the female plant.

Unlike budding, which can be performed before or during the growing season, most grafting is done during winter and early spring while both scion and rootstock are still dormant.

Zenport Grafting Blade ZJ60-B Multi-Graft Tool Replacement Blades

Replacement blades for the Zenport ZJ60 Multi-Graft Tool, Grafting Shears which are a multi-facet tool allowing inexperienced people to safely complete at least 6 different graft types with ease. This tool enables the first time grafter to prepare the following grafts – tongue, cleft, rind, whip & tongue & wedge grafts. You can also complete chip & ‘T’ buds.

Zenport Grafting Blade ZJ60-B Multi-Graft Tool Replacement Blade

Reasons for grafting and budding:

  • Perpetuate clones. Clones of numerous species cannot be economically reproduced from vegetative cuttings because the percentage of cuttings that root successfully is low. For example numerous clones of Japanese maple that either root poorly or lack an extensive root systems are grafted onto the seedling of an Acer palmatum rootstock.
  • Take advantage of particular rootstocks. Certain rootstocks have superior growth habits, disease and insect resistance, and drought tolerance. For example the French crabapple can increase resistance to crown gall and hairy root in apple trees.
  • Increase the growth rate of seedlings. The seedling progeny of many fruit and nut breeding programs may require 8 to 12 years to become fruitful. However, if these progeny are grafted onto established plants, the time required for them to flower and fruit is reduced dramatically.
  • Repair damaged plants. Large trees or specimen plants can be damaged easily above the soil line. The damage can often be repaired by planting several seedlings of the same species around the injured tree and grafting them above the injury.
  • Change varieties or cultivars. Newer varieties of trees may offer improved insect or disease resistance, better drought tolerance, or higher yields. As long as the scion is compatible with the rootstock, the older orchard may be top worked using the improved variety or cultivar.
  • Produce certain plant forms. Numerous horticultural plants owe their beauty to the fact that they are grafted or budded onto a standard, especially those that have a weeping or cascading form.
  • Optimize cross-pollination. Certain fruit trees are not self-pollinating; they require pollination by a second fruit tree through cross-pollination. To ensure good fruit set on the female (pistillate) plant, a male (staminate) plant must be growing nearby. Where this is not possible, the chances that cross-pollination will occur can be increased by grafting a scion from a male plant onto the female plant.

Unlike budding, which can be performed before or during the growing season, most grafting is done during winter and early spring while both scion and rootstock are still dormant.

Zenport Treekote Tree Wound Dressing Protect Injured Trees, Shrubs and Vines from Decay, Insects and Fungi

Zenport Treekote Tree Wound Dressing used to protect injured trees, shrubs and vines from decay, insects and fungi. Apply Treekote Tree Wound Dressing to freshly pruned areas. Can also be used for grafting, propagating orchards or patching damaged trees.

  • Easy Application: Choose from aerosol spray, brush-on formula or ready-to-use paste
  • Effective Protection: Reduces dieback and spread of harmful pathogens on tree wounds, grafts or pruning cuts
  • Weather Resistant: Won’t melt in heat or wash away in rain
Zenport Treekote® Tree Wound Dressing

Are You Ready To Start Pruning?

Hope you folks had a great harvest this year…we know 2020 has been incredibly challenging to say the least.  But It is almost that time of the year again!  Just giving you a little reminder before that pruning sneaks up on you….

Improved Cordless EPruner – Portable Battery Powered Pruner

To help you with the pruning effort we are excited let to you know that we now have larger cutting capacity blades and larger capacity batteries for your cordless ePruner!

The blade and battery prices are the same, just more power! We also made a revision to the tool with the additional improvement of a self-oiling cutting blade center bolt. The most exciting part is the price, you can buy one tool for only $271.95. In addition if you buy 10 the price drops down to $233.10/ea!

10 X Battery Powered Pruners For The Price Of One!

Basically, you can outfit your entire crew for the price of $2331 which is the cost of one battery powered pruner from the competition! This product keeps getting better and better!

To top it off, we also offer all the parts including replacement blades and batteries!  Having the parts greatly reduces your cost of ownership.  You are also covered by a 1-year warranty!  We do all the service and warranty work here in Oregon!

  • We offer you all of the parts for the tool – reduces your cost of ownership!
  • Inexpensive replacement blades and batteries!
  • You are covered by a 1-Year Oregon, USA based warranty and service!

Take a look for yourself:  Zenport Cordless ePruner EP108 – Pruner and Parts Selection

Zenport EP108 Tool Specifications

Wide Selection Of Zenport Pruning Shears

DuroKon offers the wide selection of Zenport’ horticulture pruning shears, also called hand pruners, or secateurs, which are a type of scissors for use on plants.  We only offer Genuine Zenport Parts for Zenport pruners which are specially designed to be universally compatible with other brands! You cannot beat the value and convenience!

Single-Hand Pruning Shear Selection

DuroKon single-hand horticulture Zenport pruners are strong enough to prune vines and hard branches of trees and shrubs, up to 1-inch thick.

All our Zenport pruning shears are commercial grade for use in gardening, arboriculture, farming, flower arranging, and nature conservation, where fine-scale habitat management is required.

DuroKon offers a wide selection of horticulture Zenport pruning shears

  • Zenport single-hand horticulture Zenport pruners are strong enough to prune hard branches of trees and shrubs, up to 1-inch thick
  • Zenport pruning shears are commercial grade for use in gardening, arboriculture, farming, flower arranging
  • Zenport pruners are useful in nature conservation, where fine-scale habitat management is required

Cutting Larger Than 1-Inch? Need Long Reach?

For anything larger than 1-inch in diameter and out of arms reach, DuroKon offers Zenport Loppers which are a larger, two-handed, long-handled pruners for branches thicker than single-hand pruning shears can cut.

DuroKon also offers Zenport Pruning Saws and Zenport Long Reach Cut-n-Hold Pruners for pruning dense thick hard to reach areas.

Keep Those EPruner Batteries Charged!

Lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries are an awesome technology constantly improving and that is why they are awfully expensive. To avoid problems during pruning season and voiding your warranty, please follow these battery care tips to get the longest life and best performance out of them.

  • Li-ion batteries can handle only 800 to 1,000 complete discharge cycles.
  • Charge your battery to full capacity at least once a month.
  • Do not leave them in the car—either in the cabin or the trunk. Heat (above 140 degrees F) and subzero cold can reduce battery life by 15 percent.
  • Storing a battery in direct sunlight can really heat it up, so shield it from the sun.
  • Do not store a discharged battery that has less than one-half charge. Give it a full charge and then store it.